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New Member Newby- Electric conversion of Megelli 250r

Discussion in 'New Members Say Gday' started by ron berry, Jun 4, 2018.

  1. ron berry

    ron berry Active Member

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    My Bike:
    Megelli 250r
    P1050831.JPG How time flies when crazy stuff happens, rather edgy last bit with a scrape with death and and a hospital stint due to fast moving heavy clashing objects but the new workshop is a godsend and some time to work on EV projects has finally come.
    These are the Nissan Leaf LIFeMnPO4 cells going into the pack, note four more modules, each sardine tin is 4 pouches; 2 parallel and two series so at 40Ah per pouch each module is 80Ah at 7.2V with a centre tap at 3.6V so we have a 72V system coming together, high speed hub motor looking likely.
    The "longmons" from Batrium Battery Managment System are the Aussie made BMS modules already getting fitted to the top four modules in this picture with the green lights indicating happy cells. These circuits monitor the parallel pairs of cells and will communicate by CAN bus with each-other, the charger and the display (which will probably be a cheap tablet like a pendo running Windows and the Battrium software suites on it.) Windows will communicate via a link to the Battrium brain ("Pacmon") and it sends CAN messages around a loop of yellow and blue wires that go through the whole battery pack through all the long thin longmon BMS circuits that draw power diectly from the battery and send data representing voltage, temperature, circuit status etc. and can bypass current by wasting heat with resistors to balance the cells at the end of charging (top balancing) They importantly prevent over-discharge and overcharging as the lowest voltage cell can trigger the BMS to switch the pack and/or charger off. My Chinon charger is capable of comunicating by CAN bus and being set up by the Battrium software suite.The brain also operates relays and warning/signal light LED's on the dash to display the pack status and there are opto-isolation modules and CAN to USB converter modules to make the system work (Umon etc). Their newer system is bluetooth capable. I don't get paid to advertise them or particularly recommend them but I like to be able to ring the guy up when I get problems and I like to support Australian made.
    I have the bottom plate trimmed up to fit into the engine cradle and will be reinforcing it and adding some crash bar bits to protect the pack if I drop it and trying to perfectly align the pack down the middle of the frame as there is very little extra room. Now to get the welder working again... P1050836.JPG P1050837.JPG
     
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    Last edited: Feb 23, 2020
  2. ShaneP

    ShaneP Well-Known Member Premium Member

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    Yamaha FZR250 speed bike, Yamaha YZ/WR250F, Kawasaki ZX2R, Honda VTR250, DR350 (x 3.5), a couple of prototypes and whatever else.
    The incident sounds like it could have been much worse.

    That's a lot of work you've put in. I work on Australia Post electric vehicles - Kyberz 3-wheelers. They have the a BMS that does the cell management to equal charge, etc. But there in lies some of the issues. Overtemperature cutout, charger issues and cell depletion seem to be giving us some grief in the heat, and make sure you keep it on the charger if you're not using it.
     
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  3. ron berry

    ron berry Active Member

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    The BMS is definitely the weakest link in a lithium system, most complex so most problematic, also often designed for a static use like a solar battery bank and a bit flimsy for on/off road applications. No green light from the BMS the thing won't go, mostly because balancing is important and overcharging and overdischarging fatal. This is another area where more robust and simple systems like supercapacitors or nanoflow battery systems will be better than lithium outside the obvious power to weight factor. The whole pack is as good as the weakest cell.
    I think the lithium packs may become a liability when they get old and the batteries age differentially and then take longer and more energy to balance, start to swell, have less capacity, get more internal resistence or get physically damaged by vibrations, shorts, crashes and possibly runaway high temperature madness. Early electric bike enthusiasts have lost homes to LiPO fires in my living memory and as such regulations around doing conversions will probably tighten considerably so DIYers get in soon. Hopefully the lithium can be semi retired into solar before long when our next game changing electricity storage system goes into mass production and there is still plenty of applications for when they can be recycled.
     
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  4. ShaneP

    ShaneP Well-Known Member Premium Member

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    I have a Zero electric bike, no motor unit, but the batteries will be no good not being charged regularly. Not sure if the battery control unit is any good for any other purpose, given how specific the BMS are; hopefully the motor control is separate and usable. For someone else
     
  5. ron berry

    ron berry Active Member

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    that would be the kind of controller that would be ample
    just for those who want to know about the zero;
    Range ZERO SR ZF14.4 ZERO SR ZF14.4 +Power Tank
    City? 179 miles (288 km) 223 miles (359 km)
    Highway, 55 mph (89 km/h)? 109 miles (175 km) 136 miles (219 km)
    Combined? 135 miles (217 km) 169 miles (272 km)
    Highway, 70 mph (113 km/h)? 90 miles (145 km) 112 miles (180 km)
    Combined? 120 miles (193 km) 150 miles (241 km)

    Motor
    Peak torque 116 ft-lb (157 Nm) 116 ft-lb (157 Nm)
    Peak power? 70 hp (52 kW) @ 3,500 rpm 70 hp (52 kW) @ 3,500 rpm
    Top speed (max)? 102 mph (163 km/h) 102 mph (163 km/h)
    Top speed (sustained)? 95 mph (153 km/h) 95 mph (153 km/h)
    Type Z-Force® 75-7R passively air-cooled, high efficiency, radial flux, interior permanent hi-temp magnet, brushless motor Z-Force® 75-7R passively air-cooled, high efficiency, radial flux, interior permanent hi-temp magnet, brushless motor
    Controller? High efficiency, 775 amp, 3-phase brushless controller with regenerative deceleration High efficiency, 775 amp, 3-phase brushless controller with regenerative deceleration
    Power system

    Power pack Z-Force® Li-Ion intelligent integrated Z-Force® Li-Ion intelligent integrated
    Max capacityMaximum capacity tends to be the electric vehicle industry’s choice for reporting the maximum amount of energy that can be stored in a vehicle’s power pack.

    About kWh : Where gasoline vehicles use gallons, electric vehicles frequently use kilowatt hours (kWh) to measure the total possible ‘fuel’ or energy storage capacity.

    The Formula:
    Maximum kWh = (# of cells) * (cell Amp-hour capacity rating) * (cell max voltage rating)

    ">? 14.4 kWh 18.0 kWh
    Nominal capacityNominal capacity is the most accurate measure of the amount of usable energy that can be stored in a vehicle’s power pack. It differs from maximum capacity because it is calculated using an average voltage that is more often ‘the norm’ rather than a maximum which is rarely seen.

    About kWh: Where gasoline vehicles use gallons, electric vehicles frequently use kilowatt hours (kWh) to measure the total possible ‘fuel’ or energy storage capacity.

    The Formula:
    Nominal kWh = (# of cells) * (cell Amp-hour capacity rating) * (cell nominal voltage rating)

    ">? 12.6 kWh 15.8 kWh
    Charger type 1.3 kW, integrated 1.3 kW, integrated
    Charge time (standard)Typical charge time using the motorcycle's on-board charger and a standard 110 V or 220 V outlet.

    Note that charge times from 0 to 95% are referenced because the charging rate/speed is linear within this range (e.g. 0 to 47.5% or 47.5% to 95% would take half as long as the given values). Charging from 95% to 100% takes 30 minutes, regardless of charging method, as Zero’s system is optimizing the battery’s health and long-term capacity.

    ">? 9.8 hours (100% charged) / 9.3 hours (95% charged) 12.1 hours (100% charged) / 11.6 hours (95% charged)
    With Charge Tank option? 2.5 hours (100% charged) / 2.0 hours (95% charged) N/A
    With one accessory charger Zero's scalable charging accessories allow customers to add multiple standalone chargers (in addition to the existing on-board unit) for up to a ~75% reduction in charge time, depending on the model and year.

    Zero Motorcycles generally recommends that only one charger be plugged into one circuit, including the motorcycle's on-board charger. Plugging multiple chargers into a single circuit risks drawing too much power, thereby activating the source's circuit breaker.

    Some household circuits—including many in Europe—operate at high enough capacities to power multiple chargers. It is the customer's responsibility to first verify that any given power source is rated at high enough output to safely support the load of a charger or chargers.

    Zero motorcycles' on-board chargers draw up to 1500W (Zero S, SR, DS, DSR) or 800W (Zero FX, FXS). Off-board accessory chargers draw up to 1200W.

    ">? 5.7 hours (100% charged) / 5.2 hours (95% charged) 7.0 hours (100% charged) / 6.5 hours (95% charged)
    With max accessory chargers Zero's scalable charging accessories allow customers to add multiple standalone chargers (in addition to the existing on-board unit) for up to a ~75% reduction in charge time, depending on the model and year.

    Zero Motorcycles generally recommends that only one charger be plugged into one circuit, including the motorcycle's on-board charger. Plugging multiple chargers into a single circuit risks drawing too much power, thereby activating the source's circuit breaker.

    Some household circuits—including many in Europe—operate at high enough capacities to power multiple chargers. It is the customer's responsibility to first verify that any given power source is rated at high enough output to safely support the load of a charger or chargers.

    Zero motorcycles' on-board chargers draw up to 1500W (Zero S, SR, DS, DSR) or 800W (Zero FX, FXS). Off-board accessory chargers draw up to 1200W.

    For 2020 motorcycles, the max number of accessory chargers is:
    Zero S, Zero SR, Zero DS, Zero DSR = 4
    Zero FX, Zero FXS 7.2 = 4
    Zero FX, Zero FXS 3.6 = 2

    ">? 2.8 hours (100% charged) / 2.3 hours (95% charged) 3.3 hours (100% charged) / 2.8 hours (95% charged)
    Input Standard 110 V or 220 V Standard 110 V or 220 V
    Drivetrain

    Transmission Clutchless direct drive Clutchless direct drive
    Final drive 90T / 20T, Poly Chain® HTD® Carbon™ belt 90T / 20T, Poly Chain® HTD® Carbon™ belt
    Chassis / Suspension / Brakes

    Front suspension Showa 41 mm inverted cartridge forks, with adjustable spring preload, compression and rebound damping Showa 41 mm inverted cartridge forks, with adjustable spring preload, compression and rebound damping
    Rear suspension Showa 40 mm piston, piggy-back reservoir shock with adjustable spring preload, compression and rebound damping Showa 40 mm piston, piggy-back reservoir shock with adjustable spring preload, compression and rebound damping
    Front suspension travel? 6.25 in (159 mm) 6.25 in (159 mm)
    Rear suspension travel? 6.35 in (161 mm) 6.35 in (161 mm)
    Front brakes Bosch Gen 9 ABS, J-Juan asymmetric dual piston floating caliper, 320 x 5 mm disc Bosch Gen 9 ABS, J-Juan asymmetric dual piston floating caliper, 320 x 5 mm disc
    Rear brakes Bosch Gen 9 ABS, J-Juan single piston floating caliper, 240 x 4.5 mm disc Bosch Gen 9 ABS, J-Juan single piston floating caliper, 240 x 4.5 mm disc
    Front tire Pirelli Diablo Rosso II 110/70-17 Pirelli Diablo Rosso II 110/70-17
    Rear tire Pirelli Diablo Rosso II 140/70-17 Pirelli Diablo Rosso II 140/70-17
    Front wheel 3.00 x 17 3.00 x 17
    Rear wheel 3.50 x 17 3.50 x 17
    Dimensions

    Wheelbase? 55.5 in (1,410 mm) 55.5 in (1,410 mm)
    Seat height? 31.8 in (807 mm) 31.8 in (807 mm)
    Rake? 24.0° 24.0°
    Trail? 3.2 in (80 mm) 3.2 in (80 mm)
    Weight

    Curb weight 414 lb (188 kg) 458 lb (208 kg)
    Carrying capacity 492 lb (223 kg) 448 lb (203 kg)
    Economy

    Equivalent fuel economy (city)Electric vehicle fuel economy is measured in Miles Per Gallon equivalent (MPGe) which indicates, via an Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) prescribed formula, how far an electric vehicle can go using the same amount of energy as is contained in one gallon of gasoline. Electric vehicles are much more efficient than their internal combustion engine (ICE) counterparts. An electric vehicle powertrain can turn above 90% of the energy supplied to it into usable motive power. An ICE powertrain can only turn about 25-30% of its supplied energy into motive power. The result is that an electric vehicle powertrain can operate at over three times the efficiency of its ICE counterparts.

    The Formula:
    Equivalent Fuel Economy, City = (EPA UDDS range) / (Power Pack nominal capacity) x 33.7 (EPA kWh per gallon of gasoline)

    Equivalent Fuel Economy, Highway = (Highway range) / (Power Pack nominal capacity) x 33.7 (EPA kWh per gallon of gasoline)

    ">? 477 MPGe (0.49 l/100 km) 477 MPGe (0.49 l/100 km)
    Equivalent fuel economy (highway)Electric vehicle fuel economy is measured in Miles Per Gallon equivalent (MPGe) which indicates, via an Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) prescribed formula, how far an electric vehicle can go using the same amount of energy as is contained in one gallon of gasoline. Electric vehicles are much more efficient than their internal combustion engine (ICE) counterparts. An electric vehicle powertrain can turn above 90% of the energy supplied to it into usable motive power. An ICE powertrain can only turn about 25-30% of its supplied energy into motive power. The result is that an electric vehicle powertrain can operate at over three times the efficiency of its ICE counterparts.

    The Formula:
    Equivalent Fuel Economy, City = (EPA UDDS range) / (Power Pack nominal capacity) x 33.7 (EPA kWh per gallon of gasoline)

    Equivalent Fuel Economy, Highway = (Highway range) / (Power Pack nominal capacity) x 33.7 (EPA kWh per gallon of gasoline)

    ">? 240 MPGe (0.98 l/100 km) 240 MPGe (0.98 l/100 km)
    Typical cost to rechargeThis indicates the average cost to recharge a fully drained power pack. More often, riders will be charging a partially drained power pack and will have a lower cost of recharge. The actual cost of recharging will always be dictated by the amount of charge put into the power pack and the cost of electricity flowing from the particular outlet.

    The Formula:
    Typical cost to recharge = (Average consumer cost per KWh) X (Power Pack nominal capacity) / (charging efficiency).
    Charging efficiency is 0.94 for all 2013-later models.

    ">? $1.61 $2.02
    Pricing

    MSRP $15,495 $18,390
    Does not include government incentives. Does not include local shipping, applicable taxes, PDI, or road registration fees.
    Warranty

    Standard motorcycle warranty* 2 years 2 years
    Power pack warranty* 5 years/unlimited miles
    Range ZERO S ZF7.2
    City? 89 miles (143 km)
    Highway, 55 mph (89 km/h)? 54 miles (87 km)
    Combined? 68 miles (109 km)
    Highway, 70 mph (113 km/h)? 45 miles (72 km)
    Combined? 60 miles (97 km)
    Motor
    Peak torque 78 ft-lb (106 Nm)
    Peak power? 46 hp (34 kW) @ 4,300 rpm
    Top speed (max)? 98 mph (158 km/h)
    Top speed (sustained)? 80 mph (129 km/h)
    Type Z-Force® 75-5 passively air-cooled, high efficiency, radial flux, interior permanent magnet, brushless motor
    Controller? High efficiency, 550 amp, 3-phase brushless controller with regenerative deceleration
    Power system
    Power pack Z-Force® Li-Ion intelligent integrated
    Max capacityMaximum capacity tends to be the electric vehicle industry’s choice for reporting the maximum amount of energy that can be stored in a vehicle’s power pack.

    About kWh : Where gasoline vehicles use gallons, electric vehicles frequently use kilowatt hours (kWh) to measure the total possible ‘fuel’ or energy storage capacity.

    The Formula:
    Maximum kWh = (# of cells) * (cell Amp-hour capacity rating) * (cell max voltage rating)

    ">? 7.2 kWh
    Nominal capacityNominal capacity is the most accurate measure of the amount of usable energy that can be stored in a vehicle’s power pack. It differs from maximum capacity because it is calculated using an average voltage that is more often ‘the norm’ rather than a maximum which is rarely seen.

    About kWh: Where gasoline vehicles use gallons, electric vehicles frequently use kilowatt hours (kWh) to measure the total possible ‘fuel’ or energy storage capacity.

    The Formula:
    Nominal kWh = (# of cells) * (cell Amp-hour capacity rating) * (cell nominal voltage rating)

    ">? 6.3 kWh
    Charger type 1.3 kW, integrated
    Charge time (standard)Typical charge time using the motorcycle's on-board charger and a standard 110 V or 220 V outlet.

    Note that charge times from 0 to 95% are referenced because the charging rate/speed is linear within this range (e.g. 0 to 47.5% or 47.5% to 95% would take half as long as the given values). Charging from 95% to 100% takes 30 minutes, regardless of charging method, as Zero’s system is optimizing the battery’s health and long-term capacity.

    ">? 5.2 hours (100% charged) / 4.7 hours (95% charged)
    With Charge Tank option? 1.5 hours (100% charged) / 1.0 hour (95% charged)
    With one accessory charger Zero's scalable charging accessories allow customers to add multiple standalone chargers (in addition to the existing on-board unit) for up to a ~75% reduction in charge time, depending on the model and year.

    Zero Motorcycles generally recommends that only one charger be plugged into one circuit, including the motorcycle's on-board charger. Plugging multiple chargers into a single circuit risks drawing too much power, thereby activating the source's circuit breaker.

    Some household circuits—including many in Europe—operate at high enough capacities to power multiple chargers. It is the customer's responsibility to first verify that any given power source is rated at high enough output to safely support the load of a charger or chargers.

    Zero motorcycles' on-board chargers draw up to 1500W (Zero S, SR, DS, DSR) or 800W (Zero FX, FXS). Off-board accessory chargers draw up to 1200W.

    ">? 3.1 hours (100% charged) / 2.6 hours (95% charged)
    With max accessory chargers Zero's scalable charging accessories allow customers to add multiple standalone chargers (in addition to the existing on-board unit) for up to a ~75% reduction in charge time, depending on the model and year.

    Zero Motorcycles generally recommends that only one charger be plugged into one circuit, including the motorcycle's on-board charger. Plugging multiple chargers into a single circuit risks drawing too much power, thereby activating the source's circuit breaker.

    Some household circuits—including many in Europe—operate at high enough capacities to power multiple chargers. It is the customer's responsibility to first verify that any given power source is rated at high enough output to safely support the load of a charger or chargers.

    Zero motorcycles' on-board chargers draw up to 1500W (Zero S, SR, DS, DSR) or 800W (Zero FX, FXS). Off-board accessory chargers draw up to 1200W.

    For 2020 motorcycles, the max number of accessory chargers is:
    Zero S, Zero SR, Zero DS, Zero DSR = 4
    Zero FX, Zero FXS 7.2 = 4
    Zero FX, Zero FXS 3.6 = 2

    ">? 1.6 hours (100% charged) / 1.1 hours (95% charged)
    Input Standard 110 V or 220 V
    Drivetrain
    Transmission Clutchless direct drive
    Final drive 90T / 18T, Poly Chain® HTD® Carbon™ belt
    Chassis / Suspension / Brakes
    Front suspension Showa 41 mm inverted cartridge forks, with adjustable spring preload, compression and rebound damping
    Rear suspension Showa 40 mm piston, piggy-back reservoir shock with adjustable spring preload, compression and rebound damping
    Front suspension travel? 6.25 in (159 mm)
    Rear suspension travel? 6.35 in (161 mm)
    Front brakes Bosch Gen 9 ABS, J-Juan asymmetric dual piston floating caliper, 320 x 5 mm disc
    Rear brakes Bosch Gen 9 ABS, J-Juan single piston floating caliper, 240 x 4.5 mm disc
    Front tire Pirelli Diablo Rosso II 110/70-17
    Rear tire Pirelli Diablo Rosso II 140/70-17
    Front wheel 3.00 x 17
    Rear wheel 3.50 x 17
    Dimensions
    Wheelbase? 55.5 in (1,410 mm)
    Seat height? 31.8 in (807 mm)
    Rake? 24.0°
    Trail? 3.2 in (80 mm)
    Weight
    Curb weight 313 lb (142 kg)
    Carrying capacity 404 lb (183 kg)
    Economy
    Equivalent fuel economy (city)Electric vehicle fuel economy is measured in Miles Per Gallon equivalent (MPGe) which indicates, via an Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) prescribed formula, how far an electric vehicle can go using the same amount of energy as is contained in one gallon of gasoline. Electric vehicles are much more efficient than their internal combustion engine (ICE) counterparts. An electric vehicle powertrain can turn above 90% of the energy supplied to it into usable motive power. An ICE powertrain can only turn about 25-30% of its supplied energy into motive power. The result is that an electric vehicle powertrain can operate at over three times the efficiency of its ICE counterparts.

    The Formula:
    Equivalent Fuel Economy, City = (EPA UDDS range) / (Power Pack nominal capacity) x 33.7 (EPA kWh per gallon of gasoline)

    Equivalent Fuel Economy, Highway = (Highway range) / (Power Pack nominal capacity) x 33.7 (EPA kWh per gallon of gasoline)

    ">? 477 MPGe (0.49 l/100 km)
    Equivalent fuel economy (highway)Electric vehicle fuel economy is measured in Miles Per Gallon equivalent (MPGe) which indicates, via an Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) prescribed formula, how far an electric vehicle can go using the same amount of energy as is contained in one gallon of gasoline. Electric vehicles are much more efficient than their internal combustion engine (ICE) counterparts. An electric vehicle powertrain can turn above 90% of the energy supplied to it into usable motive power. An ICE powertrain can only turn about 25-30% of its supplied energy into motive power. The result is that an electric vehicle powertrain can operate at over three times the efficiency of its ICE counterparts.

    The Formula:
    Equivalent Fuel Economy, City = (EPA UDDS range) / (Power Pack nominal capacity) x 33.7 (EPA kWh per gallon of gasoline)

    Equivalent Fuel Economy, Highway = (Highway range) / (Power Pack nominal capacity) x 33.7 (EPA kWh per gallon of gasoline)

    ">? 240 MPGe (0.98 l/100 km)
    Typical cost to rechargeThis indicates the average cost to recharge a fully drained power pack. More often, riders will be charging a partially drained power pack and will have a lower cost of recharge. The actual cost of recharging will always be dictated by the amount of charge put into the power pack and the cost of electricity flowing from the particular outlet.

    The Formula:
    Typical cost to recharge = (Average consumer cost per KWh) X (Power Pack nominal capacity) / (charging efficiency).
    Charging efficiency is 0.94 for all 2013-later models.

    ">? $0.81
    Pricing
    MSRP $10,995
    Does not include government incentives. Does not include local shipping, applicable taxes, PDI, or road registration fees.
    Warranty
    Standard motorcycle warranty* 2 years
    Power pack warranty* 5 years/unlimited miles
     
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  6. soyachips

    soyachips Active Member

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    Great to see you’re making progress on the conversion. Those Leaf cells look very nice and I’ve heard good things about the Batrium BMS. Can’t wait to see it all come together! Did you decide what battery and controller combo to use? I used a 6kW hub motor from QS Motor with a Kelly KLS7250H controller. As a commuter I’m very happy with the end result except for the battery pack which I’m upgrading now. If I was building a performance bike and had more money, I’d go for a more powerful motor and would consider the ASI BAC4000 or BAC8000 controllers. Also the battery is key so very interested to see how those Leaf cells go. I have an old ETEK motor and Alltrax AXE4834 controller from a previous project that I’m not using if you’re interested but it would need to be mid-mounted and use a chain or belt.
     
  7. ron berry

    ron berry Active Member

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    My Bike:
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    Glad for the encouragements soyachips, great to hear someone has pulled it off and is commuting. 6kW motor sounds like fun enough, I guess it is more limited by the controller. The ASI ones look swish. This project is already committed to the hub motor path due to the extra batteries taking up the room I had intended to put an etek, agni or mars motor in and building the motor ala axel borgs fzr on evalbum bwould be sitisfying but take more room, saving that adventure for a rainier day. Possible maybe to squeeze it more above the swingarm pivot and fixed to it but a friend has offered me his CBF900 Hornet to do the next one with and I have parts for a chain drive adaption and mount for the motor already...
     
  8. soyachips

    soyachips Active Member

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    That DIY motor that Axel made looks amazing but yes takes up a lot of room. I guess that's why he had to put the batteries up high which might impact handling.
     
  9. Andych

    Andych Moderator Staff Member Premium Member Contributing Member

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    What language are you guys talking???? its all double Dutch to me... lol
    Too far above my pay grade but keep up the good work :prankster:
     
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  10. ron berry

    ron berry Active Member

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    My Bike:
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    I got some prices back;
    17inch 5kw hub motor with disc brake: USD438

    17inch 8kw hub motor with disc brake: USD570

    Kelly Controller KLS7275H: USD280/PC for 8kW motor

    I asked for pricing on the throttle and instruments, DC-DC converter, contactor and harness and chose the 8kW as the stealth bomber bike I rode was adequate and comparably powered.

    for the 6 inch wide 17" motor with 10-12kW. $775USD tempting...but longer lead time and larger orders required.


    Just in case you were interested in doing a very small car up to 800 kg
    4 units x QS 72v 8000w V3 Electric Car Hub Motor 4x108 PCD: USD580/PC
    4 units x Kelly Controller KLS7275H: USD280/PC
    1 unit x Pedal Throttle: USD50
    1 unit x Speed Meter: Free
    1 set x 1 tow 4 Disc Brake Assembly: USD95/PC
    Total: USD3585

    If anybody is tempted to buy in I am open to making a combined order

    no word back on freight cost as yet
     
  11. ron berry

    ron berry Active Member

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    It has been quite a hiatus for this build while I built a luthiery school and then had to pull it apart again and move out of my rented workshop to an empty paddock and start building but glad to be back into it again. I have had to keep the pack chargd occasionally as the bms uses a bit of current and they are behaving themselves welll, the bike has got a smattering of attention.
     
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  12. jmw76

    jmw76 Well-Known Member Premium Member

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    Hi Ron,
    I am enjoying following your project.
    Could you post some photos to show where you are at with this project. It's been a while since you posted any.

    Peter.
     
  13. ron berry

    ron berry Active Member

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    IMG_0394.JPG Ok finally got somewhere after losing the lease on my workshop and moving everything in 3 weeks.... a good many months later the bond and some savings manifested some boxes of goodies. One 8000W qs motor hub motor set for 120kmph top speed at 72V, the controller at the top, a back brake and disc setup with bracket, nuts and spacers (that may need modifying to get the back wheel on nicely) instruments with the dc-dc 600W converter below, cabling, can bus and usb, and harness for all the bits (almost plug and play?) and bottom right a big fat contactor, there is a key on the throttle so now how to integrate all this into the electrics on the Megelli (for which there seems to be no wiring diagram available, hmmmm.) Add a Pirelli demon 17" tyre it starts to look feasible
    IMG_0393.JPG
    IMG_0400.JPG
     
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  14. ron berry

    ron berry Active Member

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    I have a Chennic CANbus programmable charger I can use with the Battrium BMS software and I think I can jam some of the electrical stuff in the frame where previously the air intake and 12V battery were. I am starting to wish I made a top cover for the electrics out the top half of the fuel tank but I sold it. I have some guidance from the supplier as to how it goes together....
     

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  15. ron berry

    ron berry Active Member

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    Cute TC charger with CAN bus control and 72V capable, fully programmable Battery Managment System (BMS) can tweak the charger, turn it on and off, send status messages and allow the charger and contactor and controller be controlled by the BMS software which is great as the LIFeMnPO4 chemistry has slightly different voltages and I want to run it conservatively as well. Not fully flattening to 20% every time and choosing 25% and only charging to 95% can already extend the lifetime 50% so 4500 charge cycles to 80% capacity left. TCcharger.jpg
     

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