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Help '98 Hornet 250 fork seal replacement

Discussion in 'Maintenance' started by Roan, Oct 26, 2019.

  1. Roan

    Roan Member Premium Member

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    Hi everyone, I'm currently taking apart the forks from my hornet and so far have removed the dust seals, wire clip under that and of course the bolt down at the bottom but I'm now seemingly unable to pull the leg out. I have the leg caught in the vice (with aluminium jaw covers) and giving it some fairly hefty pulls but it's not going anywhere!
    Any help or suggestions at all would be hugely appreciated!
    Roan
     
  2. Linkin

    Linkin The Apprentice Premium Member Dirty Wheel Club Contributing Member

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    On the bottom of the forks where the axle runs, there will be an allen head bolt with copper washer recessed in up where the axle runs. You have to undo them and remove them to separate the upper and lower fork sections.
     
  3. jmw76

    jmw76 Well-Known Member Premium Member

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    Some forks can be a bit of a bugger to get apart. After removing the bolt (the one that is accessible through the axle shaft area, you hold the forks in a vice and slide the other section in and out pulling hard. You effectively use the moving section like a slide hammer to knock out the top bearing and seal.
     
  4. GreyImport

    GreyImport Administrator Staff Member The Chief Contributing Member

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  5. Roan

    Roan Member Premium Member

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    Ah great stuff thanks for the quick replies! Ended up having to use a blowtorch to heat the outside of the leg (covering the chrome with a wet rag) all the way to 200 C before the damn things gave way with the method jmw76 recommended. They must have been in there a long number of years! One of the tubes even pulled through it’s seal instead of coming out...
    Thanks again!
     
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  6. jmw76

    jmw76 Well-Known Member Premium Member

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    When the fork tube bearings wear badly, the collar on the fork tube jams up inside of them rather assisting to push them out.
    You may need new bearings and collars (items 7 & 8 on the drawing that GreyImport put up).
     
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