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Help After some advice re: ZXR250a fork rebuild

Discussion in 'Kawasaki 250cc In-line 4's' started by kz1000a, Jan 22, 2019.

  1. kz1000a

    kz1000a Member Premium Member

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    2C6C6681-6E80-44AC-A83A-1D9CE662A36A.jpeg Can anyone make recommendations on where to get my forks rebuilt in Melb SE?

    I am waiting for this kit to be delivered and just don’t have the facilities / know how to do it myself.

    I’m more than happy to provide beers etc for any one local willing to help out.

    Cheers,

    Mark
     
  2. ruckusman

    ruckusman Well-Known Member Premium Member Dirty Wheel Club

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    We're very much DIY here, so you'll find both good information and advice/responses to any questions you may have, for example I seem to recall @Linkin did rebuild his forks somewhere in this thread

    https://www.2fiftycc.com/index.php?threads/bought-a-zxr250c.9291/

    FWIW, it's not a difficult job and requires a minimum of tools, for a seal driver you can get away with a PVC pipe joiner of the appropriate dimensions, the rest is either going to be spanners, socket and perhaps hex keys

    hope this helps and gets you started
     
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  3. Linkin

    Linkin The Apprentice Premium Member Dirty Wheel Club Contributing Member

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    Yeah I did mine, but I have access to a workshop, tools and seal drivers. It's a PITA Job
     
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  4. kz1000a

    kz1000a Member Premium Member

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    I try to be as “hands on” with as much as I can be in all aspects.
    (There is definitely the satisfaction aspect and you are always learning) -albeit, sometimes it does NOT go to plan
    But I reckon I might save me self some potential grief (no shed, little cover, nothing to hang front end from) and pass it over to someone experienced with suspension.
    Any recommendations?

    I read Linkin’s 25 page post in totality and was syrprised that bike was sold a month after getting it up and running so well, particularly after so many hurdles. Did you ever find the source of the rattle? Some great info there. Thanks for sharing Linkin
     
  5. kiffsta

    kiffsta Administrator Staff Member Dirty Wheel Club Contributing Member

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    If you remove the forks from the bike , a reasonable mechanic will do the seals and replace the fork oil in 1 - 1.5 hours , the average workshop rate is $110 an hour so factor in $160 - $200 in labour and about $35 for the seals , add another $50 if the forks are on the bike
     
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  6. kz1000a

    kz1000a Member Premium Member

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    Thanks for the heads up, kiffsta
     
  7. Frankster

    Frankster See the World before you leave it Staff Member Premium Member Ride and Events Crew

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    Post when you find a mechanic, cost and quality of work. I'd be keen to get a set done professionally at some stage. As Linkin said, it's a PITA job doing USD forks.
     
  8. kz1000a

    kz1000a Member Premium Member

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    Certainly will do Frankster
     
  9. ruckusman

    ruckusman Well-Known Member Premium Member Dirty Wheel Club

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    @Linkin - Any chance you can detail the hurdles/difficulties as I'm going to do mine and to be forewarned is to be forearmed - from your pics, it looks simple enough, but clearly that's a trap
     
  10. kz1000a

    kz1000a Member Premium Member

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    Are there subtle differences between the A model & C model forks?
    i.e. C model has rebound, compression & spring preload adjusts.
    i.e. A model doesn’t have all all the above

    I believe that I have read on this forum that the A model has a 20 “click” slotted screwdriver adjust feature at the very top of the fork. But I cannot find this info again. Any links welcome.

    Correct me if I am wrong, but the C model has an 8.5 “click” feature ?
     
  11. TonyZXR

    TonyZXR Active Member Premium Member

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    Beware of the bushings . Didnt end up using them when I rebuilt forks . They were too tight even with the right tools I couldn't get them in so I re used the originals because the teflon coating was still good anyway
     
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  12. Frankster

    Frankster See the World before you leave it Staff Member Premium Member Ride and Events Crew

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  13. kz1000a

    kz1000a Member Premium Member

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    Thx Tony, although all things point to an A model, I’m not sure if I have A model or C model forks, according to parts diagram are different
    It would seeem that C model has an extra “compression dampening force adjustment” on Pg 12:5 of zxr c manual. Which I do not have part no.161268 on lower fork.
     
  14. Frankster

    Frankster See the World before you leave it Staff Member Premium Member Ride and Events Crew

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    You'll have ZXR250A forks. Post a pic if you're still worried, but they should look like this.

    Forks.JPG
     
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    Last edited: Feb 4, 2019
  15. sharky

    sharky Well-Known Member Premium Member

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    A model forks are a golden color with no lower adjustment, C model are bronzish in colour with lower left adjuster. I use nothing more than a few screwdrivers & ring spanners to do mine, use the old bushings to punch in the new ones & wrap your fork lowers with electrical tape to drive your seals. Follow the manual step by step there not that hard to do, most upside forks are similar.
     
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  16. kz1000a

    kz1000a Member Premium Member

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    Thank you all.
    They are definitely gold with no lower adjustment.

    There is a good video here of USD fork seal replacement by Delboys.

     
  17. kz1000a

    kz1000a Member Premium Member

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    Update

    My forks have been at a suspension rebuild specialist.
    I have a phone call from the shop saying that that the forks need rechroming, due to the pitting/scratches in the following pictures.

    26077C0F-E2B2-44A6-8E99-9CA5CD099C0A.jpeg 18BFBF81-4BB0-4612-AC8F-D052FD4F0658.jpeg

    n the above picture, the left hand side has an obvious thread.
    Is this threaded end the LOWER end of the fork that will attach/screw into the part with the ‘RACE TECH’ sticker on it in the following picture?

    10D3C1F2-5120-49F6-B6A1-EC27BE77C610.jpeg 1D1ABF17-CEB2-437F-9FF4-9A82F82B3E37.png Update


    If my reasoning is correct, then it’s hard for me to say if my forks would ever compress into this “pitted / scratched” region under normal conditions, and damage the new seals.


    What is the consensus here learned colleagues, is the shop making a valid statement, or am I being taken for a ride (no pun intended)
     
    Last edited: Feb 13, 2019
  18. Linkin

    Linkin The Apprentice Premium Member Dirty Wheel Club Contributing Member

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    First fork leg has worse pitting than the other. If the oil seal does not run over that part when fully compressed, it should be OK. Where the seals run a lot the chrome goes shiny and loses its finish. Some high-gret wet and dry with soapy water in a cross hatch pattern will ensure that the seals do their job.
     
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  19. Murdo

    Murdo The Good Doctor Staff Member Premium Member Ride and Events Crew Contributing Member

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    Depends on how often you want to change seals. It only takes one deep pothole where the seals go over the rusty bits and your new seals are stuffed. Also those shiney bits wont hold the oil when they get too polished.
    I would get those rechromed and know that I will have no more trouble with them. RAD hard chroming in Brisbane do all my fork legs. Don't worry about getting the bottom bits off as they have the right tools to do that. Most cost around $400 for the pair.
    http://www.radhardchroming.com.au/
     
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  20. kz1000a

    kz1000a Member Premium Member

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    Thank you Linkin & Murdo
    Best do what the doctor has ordered then.... :thumb_ups:
     
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