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Help Getting old tank liner out

Discussion in 'Tech Tips' started by Perth gsxr, Jul 18, 2019.

  1. Perth gsxr

    Perth gsxr Member Premium Member

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    so guys, I just picked up a 1992 zxr 250 and it has a piece of what looks like grey / silver compound sliding around in the tank. it looks like who ever tried to line the tank didn't get a lot of the remaining "stuff' out and a fair bit settled in the lower part of the tank and has now come loose. What can I do to get this out by dissolving it. it is larger than the tank opening. I'll have to then put some kill rust / phosphoric acid in the tank later too I guess.
     
  2. ruckusman

    ruckusman Well-Known Member Premium Member Dirty Wheel Club

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    I had an FZR250 tank with the liner poorly done, some had broken loose and there was still some attached, there is still some in there down the sides in the small channel towards, but there is not chance of them flaking and clogging thing up.

    For the stuff which is loose, shake it till you break is basically - it's a chore, and then fish it out by holding the tank upside down and shaking till it comes out of the fuel cap hole.

    There isn't a chemical that I know of which can dissolve the stuff.

    The cleanup the inside of the tank and perhaps have any more liner which isn't working - likely has some rust underneath is, try electrolysis

    Here's my thread on it from years ago - it works wonders. https://2fiftycc.com/index.php?threads/rusty-fuel-tank-electrolysis.1809/

    What I did find that the conversion which took place during electrolysis dislodged other pieces of liner which had surface rust beneath them

    Be prepared to do it again and again over 3 to 5 days to get good results, it is worth the effort

    Good luck
     
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  3. sharky

    sharky Well-Known Member Premium Member

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    The companies that make these tank liners usually make another product that can strip the liner, I'm fairly certain there acetone based.
     
  4. ruckusman

    ruckusman Well-Known Member Premium Member Dirty Wheel Club

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    OK so I've just done some reading on the matter - I would forget acetone, it likely just isn't powerful enough

    Two options, both of which I've dealt with in the past, nasty, nasty chemicals
    MEK - Methyl Ethyl Ketone - I used to get it in 4 litre containers from the boat building supplies place which sells epoxy resins and the like

    Methylene Chloride - this stuff is HOT, what I mean by that is that it literally boils off at about 20 degrees and the fumes go everywhere, even with a gas respirator, the fumes will land on your eyeballs and make them sting, so use it outdoors. It's other issue is that it attacks rubber, most rubber so double or triple gloves and don't spill it, available from the same place as MEK

    Third option, really extreme, get it cooked/baked out as is mentioned in this thread
    https://www.jockeyjournal.com/forum/archive/index.php/t-160977.html
     
  5. Murdo

    Murdo The Good Doctor Staff Member Premium Member Ride and Events Crew Contributing Member

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    Interesting about the pink PVC pipe primer in the above link. I could smell the MEK in it but it has other stuff to make it even stronger.
    Try to get some bits out and put in glass jars with different chemicals to see what dissolves the liner. I have heard of people using paint stripper too (good stuff from auto paint places) but never tried it myself.
     
  6. BlueDragon

    BlueDragon Member Premium Member

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    I had the same issue with my GSX1400. Huge chunks and some thin bits peeling off the inside. I ended up cutting a large section of the base of the tank out and then removed the large chunks. To get the rest of it out, I then got my drill with a wire brush on the end - doing this, remember to wear a face mask so you don't breathe the crap in.

    Got it all cleaned out and then went to a radiator place to have the base soldered back in again. Once that was done, I then bought the KBS tank liner kit from a seller on ebay and re-lined the tank properly. Though a bit of a process with that as I had to block a lot of internal pipes as the bike is fuel injected, so not just a simple gravity feed fuel tap . The process isn't difficult to re-line the tank. Just time consuming, lots of patience and follow the instructions exactly. But also think about the best way to drain out the excess. With some of it I actually got a long handle paint brush which scooped up the bulk part of the excess. The rest drained out one of the fuel pump holes. Leave it for 4 or 5 days to cure and dry out, then you are OK to put a litre of fuel in to flush the inside out. - Drain it and then put the tank back together, fuel tap/pump etc whatever is the case and install it back on the bike.
     
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