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Pinned So what have you done to your bike today?

Discussion in 'The Pub' started by kiffsta, Nov 3, 2013.

  1. Frankster

    Frankster Grey Pride...Adventure before Dementia Staff Member Premium Member Ride and Events Crew

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    Well, I spent most of today helping a mate sort out some of the issues he has been having with his KLX250. His mechanic said the bike needed to have the forks rebuild, head stem bearings changed and his carb needed to be replaced. He was quoted over $2,000 for the work and he kind off freaked out. He's a good guy who only got his bike license recently and wants to learn about doing his own maintenance and basic mechanical work. He kept sending me text messages and emails about replacement carbs, so I offered to show him what I could the next time I was in Melbourne. I asked him to get whatever parts where needed to do the front end, but not to buy a carb until we got it off and had a poke around. His mechanic had removed the carb ($350) and said it wasn't repairable and a new one was the only option. So, the first thing we did is pull the carb off and have a little look-see at what was going on in there and why fuel was pissing out through the bowl drain tube. There was a tiny piece of metal jammed in the seat stopping the needle from closing properly. Quick clean and check over jets and orifices and a quick bench test to check for leaks...no issues. So, my mate is out of pocket for some fork seals & head stem bearings. He's also a little bit more knowledgeable.

    KLX250.JPG

    His middle son (he is a single father with 3 boys) is a bike nut, so he was constantly asking questions and he got a quick lesson on carbs when one of his bikes was playing up after he put a new carb on it. We pulled his old Jingke carb apart and went over what does what and how to check jetting etc. He was very happy to get some help to sort his bike out and learn along the way.

    I suggested my mate buy some JIS screwdrivers, some rubber grease, a pick set and a few other bits so he can practice doing some of the work we went over today. His bike is also missing the airbox cover and air inlet...not ideal for a trail bike.

    All-in-all, a rewarding day, but my back is killing me.
     
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    Last edited: May 12, 2024
  2. ruckusman

    ruckusman White Mans Magic Master Premium Member Dirty Wheel Club

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    Didn't even need a new needle and seat valve by the sound of it, he's learnt mechanical skills and hopefully knowledgeable enough to never go back to that mechanic...$2K - that's rude IMO
     
  3. Jo Verhelst

    Jo Verhelst Forty2 Contributing Member

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    I don't know what i'm doing and I don't want to work on it, so let's ask a lot of money and hopefully never see them again kind of rude blush.gif
     
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  4. Frankster

    Frankster Grey Pride...Adventure before Dementia Staff Member Premium Member Ride and Events Crew

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    Yes, the needle was in good shape and the rubber was soft, so I guessed that the mechanic had replaced this as part of his investigation. I cleaned the seat with some ear buds and carb cleaner to remove any muck and it all went back together rather well. To be fair to the mechanic and his quote, the carb on this bike is not available (as far as I know) as an aftermarket unit. It has a special connector that is plumbed into the cooling system, so water coolant is doing something in there? The only replacement carb available is from Kawasaki, so that isn't cheap. I can tell you getting the carb off (and back on again) was an adventure I don't want to repeat.
     
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  5. ruckusman

    ruckusman White Mans Magic Master Premium Member Dirty Wheel Club

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    TBH it sounds like he didn't replace those parts or did a poor job when he did, I know you're being generous in your assessment, but unless a carb is physically damaged, they're serviceable.
    Your discovery that is was overflowing is pretty basic stuff all told, and remedied easily.

    Carbs in general are always an adventure and curse words are obligatory IMO.
     
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  6. Jo Verhelst

    Jo Verhelst Forty2 Contributing Member

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    garagenoise.jpeg
     
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  7. DanoHosko

    DanoHosko Well-Known Member Premium Member

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    Picked up the cylinder head after having the seats cut, for the ZXR250
    :cool:

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  8. KiwiMat

    KiwiMat Well-Known Member

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    Bought a K1300S a few months ago , rear suspension was fckt, paid $6k for it with 12 months rego on it. Got the rear shock for the K1300S serviced and re-valved at Shock Treatment, spring for 110kg rider and luggage.
    Did the install yesterday and today, old shock had to come out, i had a shock on the shelf from a previous bike i wrecked which is the one i got rebuilt. Its an ESA (electronic adjustable suspension) shock so borrowed a GS911 diagnostics module from a mate to set the limits of adjustment.
    I have the service manual on disc, these BMW's are so nice to work on, except for plugging the 3 ESA wires back in and lining up the oil reservoir to bolt it in under the seat.
    Anyways , rode it around the block and the bike i so nice to ride now, ESA has 3 preload settings (1 rider/ 1 rider and luggage / 2 riders and luggage) and 3 ride modes ( comfortable/normal/ sport) comfy mode soaks up all the bumps. few pics below.

    Rebuilt Shock with new spring
    20240523_171307.jpg

    20240524_160231.jpg

    20240524_175504.jpg


    Old Spring leaking away on the bench....
    20240525_143620.jpg


    GS911 diagnostic tool for resetting ESA suspension limits.
    20240525_195832.jpg


    Ready for a thrashing... brand new Pirelli GT's A spec tyres on it. Oil and final drive fluid done. Aftermarket levels installed... nearly crashed the bike in the car, the new clutch leaver had not been adjusted and wasnt disengaging the clutch... fixed that...
    The rubber boot one the swingarm before the final drive will need replacing, its gone hard and showing starts of cracks..
    20240525_141313.jpg
     
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    Last edited: May 25, 2024 at 8:28 PM

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