1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Project '98 Suzuki Across

Discussion in 'Your 250cc Projects' started by Laceysnr, Aug 8, 2019.

  1. Cbuzz

    Cbuzz Well-Known Member Dirty Wheel Club

    Messages:
    142
    Likes Received:
    58
    Trophy Points:
    233
    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2017
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Australia
    My Bike:
    ZXR250A
    What area u in? May be able to have a squiz if your local over a beer, second set of eyes in never hurt. I must have rebuilt my across carbs at least 1000 times :lolsign:
     
    • Funny Funny x 1
  2. Laceysnr

    Laceysnr Member Premium Member

    Messages:
    75
    Likes Received:
    26
    Trophy Points:
    28
    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2019
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Hacker
    Location:
    Melbourne, Australia
    Home Page:
    My Bike:
    '98 Suzuki Across + '14 CBR500R
    That's the thing though, I can't drop it down! The screw's wound out, mixture screws are in stock position (won't start if I wind them in any further), and it's revving like a nutter.
     
  3. Laceysnr

    Laceysnr Member Premium Member

    Messages:
    75
    Likes Received:
    26
    Trophy Points:
    28
    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2019
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Hacker
    Location:
    Melbourne, Australia
    Home Page:
    My Bike:
    '98 Suzuki Across + '14 CBR500R
    I'm in Mordialloc (Melbourne SE). She's pefectly ridable even though it's out of whack so can travel.

    Put new brake pads on last night, gonna take her out this evening to bed them in a bit. Front brake lever already feels a tonne better though, they old ones were more worn than I thought.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  4. Frankster

    Frankster See the World before you leave it Staff Member Premium Member Ride and Events Crew

    Messages:
    2,363
    Likes Received:
    1,280
    Trophy Points:
    823
    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2013
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Melbourne
    My Bike:
    Spada & VT250F
    Did you try and lower the idle as @my67xr suggested? I'm away until November, otherwise I'd offer to have a look (I'm in Oakleigh when in Melbourne).
     
  5. Laceysnr

    Laceysnr Member Premium Member

    Messages:
    75
    Likes Received:
    26
    Trophy Points:
    28
    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2019
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Hacker
    Location:
    Melbourne, Australia
    Home Page:
    My Bike:
    '98 Suzuki Across + '14 CBR500R
    I can't! The adjustment is all the way out! I'll keep on tinkering and if I get nowhere might chase you up when you're here.
     
  6. Frankster

    Frankster See the World before you leave it Staff Member Premium Member Ride and Events Crew

    Messages:
    2,363
    Likes Received:
    1,280
    Trophy Points:
    823
    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2013
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Melbourne
    My Bike:
    Spada & VT250F
    No probs. I'll keep an eye on this thread.
     
  7. Laceysnr

    Laceysnr Member Premium Member

    Messages:
    75
    Likes Received:
    26
    Trophy Points:
    28
    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2019
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Hacker
    Location:
    Melbourne, Australia
    Home Page:
    My Bike:
    '98 Suzuki Across + '14 CBR500R
    Well, I kept on dicking around with it and worked out the idle adjustment screw wasn't fully backed out after all, the damned thing was looping up and not rotating. Yanked it as I turned and managed to get that last little bit of adjustment out of it, which dropped the revs down while hot to where they should be. Once I did that this morning I got the carbtune back on there and managed to get them in sync at last.

    Current issues:

    * Minor hesitations still over 11k rpm
    * Very minor fork oil leak on the LHS

    Never done anything with forks but seems like the first step would be to just check for any grit etc. caught in the seal.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  8. GreyImport

    GreyImport Administrator Staff Member The Chief Contributing Member

    Messages:
    8,712
    Likes Received:
    5,168
    Trophy Points:
    1,168
    Joined:
    Jun 14, 2012
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Troublemaker
    Location:
    North by NW NSW Oztralia - Tamworth
    My Bike:
    *Kawasaki ZXR250C *Yamaha FZR250R 3LN1 *Suzuki GSX250 *Triumph Bonneville 750 T140V *Triumph Daytona 675
    • Agree Agree x 1
  9. Laceysnr

    Laceysnr Member Premium Member

    Messages:
    75
    Likes Received:
    26
    Trophy Points:
    28
    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2019
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Hacker
    Location:
    Melbourne, Australia
    Home Page:
    My Bike:
    '98 Suzuki Across + '14 CBR500R
    Awesome, thanks! Will grab one and see how I go.

    Rode to a mate's place on Thursday morning and found out the hard way that my second-stage fuel light isn't working. The light works as they both light up after turning the engine off, so it must be either the sensor or a bad connection somewhere. Luckily I was only a couple of k's away from my mate so he brought some fuel for me. Crazy handy being able to carry a laptop around without needing a bag :D
     
    • Like Like x 1
  10. Jethalter

    Jethalter Active Member Premium Member

    Messages:
    295
    Likes Received:
    136
    Trophy Points:
    148
    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2019
    Location:
    Australia
    My Bike:
    1990 Suzuki Across + 2004 Dragster 650 + 1971 CB500F + 1975 CB400F - 1978 CB550 + 1985 GT550 + 1982 ct110 mini chopper + 2008 Hyosung GT650P + 1988 Yamaha FZR400
    The seal fixes to me are just a cheap excuse not to do them properly. Seals are cheap and oil is cheap and it transforms it. Not to mention do you know how much oil you've lost to get them equal. Dirt bikes esp with usd forks i can understand.

    For the sake of literally 2 hours of your life, just put new seals and oil in. Its easy as.
     
    Last edited: Oct 18, 2019
  11. Laceysnr

    Laceysnr Member Premium Member

    Messages:
    75
    Likes Received:
    26
    Trophy Points:
    28
    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2019
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Hacker
    Location:
    Melbourne, Australia
    Home Page:
    My Bike:
    '98 Suzuki Across + '14 CBR500R
    I'll do some reading/watching - like I said, never touched forks before and will have to find a way to get the bike up in the air too. When I took the back of the bike apart I got the frame on top of the axle stands I use for my car, but not sure if I can do that with everything in place.

    Are seals pretty generic based on the fork diameter?
     
  12. Jethalter

    Jethalter Active Member Premium Member

    Messages:
    295
    Likes Received:
    136
    Trophy Points:
    148
    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2019
    Location:
    Australia
    My Bike:
    1990 Suzuki Across + 2004 Dragster 650 + 1971 CB500F + 1975 CB400F - 1978 CB550 + 1985 GT550 + 1982 ct110 mini chopper + 2008 Hyosung GT650P + 1988 Yamaha FZR400
  13. GreyImport

    GreyImport Administrator Staff Member The Chief Contributing Member

    Messages:
    8,712
    Likes Received:
    5,168
    Trophy Points:
    1,168
    Joined:
    Jun 14, 2012
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Troublemaker
    Location:
    North by NW NSW Oztralia - Tamworth
    My Bike:
    *Kawasaki ZXR250C *Yamaha FZR250R 3LN1 *Suzuki GSX250 *Triumph Bonneville 750 T140V *Triumph Daytona 675
    Easy as ? ... yea right ... go read up on doing USD forks on a ZXR


    And dont presume everyone has the skill to do more intricate jobs on bikes .... or the 'tools to do it' ... especially SSTs

    Sure the 'seal fixes' are a temporary thing , but sure beats oil pissing out all over everything until it can be done properly
     
    • Like Like x 1
  14. Jethalter

    Jethalter Active Member Premium Member

    Messages:
    295
    Likes Received:
    136
    Trophy Points:
    148
    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2019
    Location:
    Australia
    My Bike:
    1990 Suzuki Across + 2004 Dragster 650 + 1971 CB500F + 1975 CB400F - 1978 CB550 + 1985 GT550 + 1982 ct110 mini chopper + 2008 Hyosung GT650P + 1988 Yamaha FZR400
    I just did a set of usd forks, wasn't much different to regular forks. if anything actually easier.

    The special tool you can buy a universal one if need be, its a cone on the end of a rod, or you can use a nut on a long bit of all thread provided its the right size nut.

    There really isn't much too them. And we talking about across forks here, the hardest bit is literally getting the bolt from underneath without the internal spinning hence a sst makes it easier.
     
    • Funny Funny x 1
  15. Jethalter

    Jethalter Active Member Premium Member

    Messages:
    295
    Likes Received:
    136
    Trophy Points:
    148
    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2019
    Location:
    Australia
    My Bike:
    1990 Suzuki Across + 2004 Dragster 650 + 1971 CB500F + 1975 CB400F - 1978 CB550 + 1985 GT550 + 1982 ct110 mini chopper + 2008 Hyosung GT650P + 1988 Yamaha FZR400
    71774568_135818101043580_2455724843719458816_o.jpg

    Here is an example, fork oil old on the left, new on the right, from 6 year old forks. Left fork had 350ml, Right fork had 280ml, Both are meant to have 380ml.

    There are plenty of capable people to do them, there are always others willing to help if people ask for it.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  16. Laceysnr

    Laceysnr Member Premium Member

    Messages:
    75
    Likes Received:
    26
    Trophy Points:
    28
    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2019
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Hacker
    Location:
    Melbourne, Australia
    Home Page:
    My Bike:
    '98 Suzuki Across + '14 CBR500R
    Given that you've done Across ones before @Jethalter I may well be asking you :)
     
    • Like Like x 3
  17. Laceysnr

    Laceysnr Member Premium Member

    Messages:
    75
    Likes Received:
    26
    Trophy Points:
    28
    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2019
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Hacker
    Location:
    Melbourne, Australia
    Home Page:
    My Bike:
    '98 Suzuki Across + '14 CBR500R
    Welp, I finally decided to get stuck into the forks after ordering some new seals just before Christmas. Watched a few videos to get an idea of what was to come, and of course checked out the service manual too. All in all it wasn't a bad job, but it took a while being my first time to learn a few lessons.

    First off I did my best to remove as much of the corrosion on the stanchions as I could. I polished the buggers for ages with a heap of aluminium foil and a fair amount of Silvo. They've still got some marks, and you can still feel them, but they're far smoother than they were before and I don't think they're going to cut up the new seals.

    Before shot of the one that was pissing oil everywhere:
    before.jpg

    And then after about half an hour and many pieces of foil:

    after.jpg

    I'll probably revisit them again later on but wanted to get it back on the road and really don't want to fork (pun intended) out for re-chroming right now.

    The only other crappy bit, which was to be expected, was getting the damper bolts out of the bottom - sure enough after enough torque was applied the damper just started spinning in the leg and there was no way I was going to shift that bolt by hand. In the end it took a combination of things: first, heat from a heat gun, second an impact driver I borrowed from a mate fitted with a hex-key socket I got from Bunnings, and finally pressure. Putting the spring, spacer and end cap back on wasn't enough to stop the damper spinning, but by putting the fork upside down and compressing it while I pulled the trigger did the trick for both legs. The old oil was clearly 20+ years old and super nasty, now she's back together with new seals and nice fresh oil (and enough oil! one leg was 100ml down). Rode her to work today and not only did she feel much more planted, but was diving far less under braking and there was no sign of fork oil on the tubes when I arrived. Result!

    The oil that was in them was very nasty, clearly 22 years old, and now it's back on the road and not
     
    • Nice Work Nice Work x 4
    • Like Like x 1
    • Winner Winner x 1
  18. Murdo

    Murdo The Good Doctor Staff Member Premium Member Ride and Events Crew Contributing Member

    Messages:
    5,249
    Likes Received:
    4,094
    Trophy Points:
    1,148
    Joined:
    May 4, 2013
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Retired
    Location:
    Tamworth, NSW
    My Bike:
    Maico 250, Royal Enfield 250, CF 250 V5 and 650TK, XL250, CBR250, plus a few others.
    Nice work. Sometimes a piece of rod with ground end or old bolt welded to it and put down the inside will hold the damper rod to undo the damper bolt.
    No matter how much you polish the chrome the seals will still leak again after a while as those little chips and rust craters will still damage the seals. Even dried insects will damage the seal lips with enough up and down movement. If you plan to keep the bike and do some Km's on it then start saving for a re-chrome.
     
    • Like Like x 1

Share This Page