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Project CB250RS Restoration/Rebuild

Discussion in 'Your 250cc Projects' started by TechHeadFred, May 16, 2014.

  1. risky

    risky risky

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    My Bike:
    honda ca77, megelli x2,fzr yamaha x 5 ,maxim,cb750.cb600 hornet,zxr250,marusho magnum electra.
    yes and he pounded her till she took no more but got him home.it was overloaded and caned but withstood the ride er abuse!all i can say is he rode the guts out of it and it stood up.also got a prize for longest distance.hope he strokes it every night in appreciation.coming again this year fred as i hope to ride the cbx and maybe trailer the marusho magnum electra to murdo,s.
     
  2. TechHeadFred

    TechHeadFred Well-Known Member Premium Member Contributing Member

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    Sadly I didn't make it this year @risky - maybe next year.

    Hmmm, this thread is overdue for an update. Been working on the top end and got a new left hand switch set to install...
     
  3. Gumper

    Gumper Member Premium Member

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    We're waiting....mind you I'm a fine one to talk.
     
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  4. TechHeadFred

    TechHeadFred Well-Known Member Premium Member Contributing Member

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    My Third Annual Start And/Or Ride A CB250RS Day
    (Originally Posted on 26/01/2017)

    For many Australians, today is a day of celebration. For most indigenous Australians, it is a day of mourning.

    For me it is both, yet neither.

    19 years ago on this day I had the saddest news of my life.

    RIP Mum.

    In light of this, January 26th has been my Annual “Start And/Or Ride A CB250RS Day” for the last few years.

    Today, I got Eric to start again for the first time this year and confirmed that Scarlet’s battery is still in reasonable condition.



    I gave Eric a thorough look over to confirm everything I already knew about that needs attention, and discovered a few things.

    The fuel tap leaks when in the Reserve position and drips onto the engine. Not ideal, considering the small tank capacity. This was a new discovery.

    [​IMG]

    While the left muffler is complete, the right one is only a header pipe (hence the exhaust note when starting him). This one was already on the list, and I’ve found a likely aftermarket bolt-on candidate.

    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    Another known issue -the right side panel is missing, so I borrowed Bruiser’s to cover the battery for now.

    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    His mirrors are currently on Sylvie, so he’ll get them back when Sylvie’s are replaced.

    [​IMG]

    The fork seals are leaking terribly and the fork oil probably needs changing, or at least topping up. This was another new discovery.

    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    The front brake master cylinder has no fluid whatsoever and could use a better cover.. While this was on the list, I’d forgotten about it.

    [​IMG]

    The lights don’t seem to work at all, the rear tyre is flat, and last of all the rear of the frame has been chopped by a previous owner who was planning to turn him into a cafe racer or bobber. These are also known issues.

    I’m thinking the best course of action at this stage is to remove Bruiser’s engine and transfer Eric’s engine and all the working parts onto Bruiser’s frame.

    It’s also way past time I gave Scarlet some attention, so expect more vintage Honda updates in the near future!

    (copied from my blog post of the same name)
     
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  5. TechHeadFred

    TechHeadFred Well-Known Member Premium Member Contributing Member

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    Scarlet Gets Some Attention At Last
    Originally Posted on 30/01/2017)

    I haven’t posted any updates on Scarlet in a while for personal reasons. This doesn’t mean I’ve done nothing with her in the last 12 months, however!

    Although I haven’t written about it previously, I have replaced the head gasket, adjusted the valve clearances, replaced the regulator/rectifier with a brand new aftermarket one and replaced the clutch friction plates and finally filled her up with fresh oil..

    I also took my usual amount of photos as I went along, so these will be added in future posts.

    Last weekend I decided to try starting Scarlet again, since she hasn’t been run for over a year.

    This of course meant swapping the known working battery back from Eric again.

    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]

    I had to open the cover to Eric’s tool compartment, as the top of it was blocking the battery.

    [​IMG]

    Scarlet’s looking great but the battery that was in her didn’t seem to be working.

    [​IMG]

    I pulled the battery out to see if it was the problem.

    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    This is not a healthy-looking battery!

    [​IMG]

    Swapped out for the one that I know works well enough to start Eric.

    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]

    Off with the seat to check wiring connections.

    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]

    Nothing obviously wrong here, so off came the tank to check further along the wiring loom.

    [​IMG]

    Fuel tap to the OFF position

    [​IMG]

    Disconnect the fuel line…

    [​IMG]

    Pop off the left side cover…

    [​IMG]

    And finally remove the tank!

    [​IMG]

    Here’s the aftermarket regulator/rectifier. I’m not sure if it could be the source of the electrical problems.

    [​IMG]

    Also looks like this clip has seen better days!

    [​IMG]

    I reconnected the original reg/rec temporarily to see if there was any improvement. No change to the lack of neutral light, even after several kicks of the starter.

    [​IMG]

    I figured I may as well at least replace the cable clip, so I grabbed the spare one from Bruiser.

    [​IMG]

    It looked a little thirsty, so a squirt of Inox was applied and the residue wiped off with a rage.

    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    I gave her a bit more of a polish with Inox and found the summer heat was getting a little too intense, so I put her back together and called it a day.

    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]

    I’ll need to spend some time checking over the electrical troubleshooting section and wiring diagram again. I have some ideas on where to start, so will test my theories before next week’s update.


    (copied from my blog post of the same name)
     
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  6. TechHeadFred

    TechHeadFred Well-Known Member Premium Member Contributing Member

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    Sylvie's Predecessors Confound Me
    (Originally Posted on 06/02/2017)

    I was still trying to figure out what’s going on with Scarlet’s electrical system. I started by having a look at the wiring inside Eric’s headlight.

    [​IMG]

    While enough seems to be connected to start the bike and get a neutral light, not much else was working last time I ran him.

    [​IMG]

    I checked my slightly modified wiring on Scarlet…

    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    I noticed a blue wire that didn’t seem to be plugged in, but it was only one headlight connection that may have come loose when I removed the headlight from the housing.

    [​IMG]

    I plugged it in anyway.

    [​IMG]



    There was a black connector with two sockets that didn’t seem to have anything connected to it., so I had another look at Eric’s wiring. The same connector had nothing plugged in either!

    I decided it was time to consult the wiring diagram in the Haynes manual.

    [​IMG]
    This proved surprisingly unhelpful, so I checked my PDF copy of the Honda workshop manual as I remembered seeing a picture of the cable routing in there.

    Unfortunately, this just shows the main connection blocks and is in black and white.

    [​IMG]

    As the weather was rather hot, I gave up for the day.

    Checking the Honda manual again, I found several wiring diagrams. After consulting the list of Honda Motorcycle Area Codes at cmsnl.com, I found the correct one for the Australian version.

    [​IMG]

    This tells me two things:

    1. I need a physical copy of the official Honda shop manual!
    2. I’ll have to spend more time working this one out – I suspect maybe the fairly amateur wiring changes I made so long ago to get Scarlet working may have failed.
    Maybe it’s time to swap Eric’s motor over to Bruiser and swap the wiring loom over to Scarlet…

    (Copied from part of my blog post Sylvie Has a Screw Loose And Her Predecessors Confound Me)
     
  7. brinkcx

    brinkcx Well-Known Member

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    The CDI on the CB250RS doesn't need any 12V stuff to run, it gets its own power directly from the stator. Only ignition wiring in/around the headlamp is the Black/white wire for the kill switch and main switch, it is connected to ground to stop the CDI working, make sure that this Bl/W wire is not grounded . Or just disconnect everything except wires connecting stuff to the CDI and it should work, no battery or neutral light needed, run the troubleshooting list from the FSM if it still no spark. Only the CDI unit itself is difficult to test (use known good one), the rest should be simple resistance checks using a multimeter.

    Yes, I know, sounds simple but reality may interfere....
     
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  8. TechHeadFred

    TechHeadFred Well-Known Member Premium Member Contributing Member

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    Thanks for the suggestion! I have at least one CDI that's known to be working, as Eric starts pretty reliably. I'll try swapping them over...

    Lights working on Scarlet would be nice though, as I'm keen to get her re-registered!
     
  9. TechHeadFred

    TechHeadFred Well-Known Member Premium Member Contributing Member

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    Scarlet Gets Her Mojo Back
    (Originally Posted on 13/02/2017)

    I’ve been determined to get Scarlet working again, so I decided to have another look at the electrical system.

    Of course, the first order of business was to remove the battery

    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]

    Before swapping the wiring looms over on Scarlet and Eric, I decided to follow up a suggestion from from @brinkcx, who had mentioned it might be worth replacing Scarlet’s CDI box with a known good one.

    [​IMG]

    I put the battery on to charge for a little while before attempting any electrical troubleshooting.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]



    Remembering that Eric seemed to have no trouble starting, I thought it a fairly safe bet that his CDI was in working order. Off it came!

    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]

    Looks pretty serviceable.

    [​IMG]

    Scarlet’s looked ok at first…

    [​IMG]

    …but on closer inspection it didn’t look so good. Scarlet’s old CDI is on the left, the replacement from Eric is on the right.

    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    There was still a noticeable difference after spraying both sets of terminals with contact cleaner.

    [​IMG]

    As the one on the left seems to have burnt out, it won’t be going on Eric. I may have spare somewhere for when the time comes to start him again.

    After fitting the replacement, I had a quick look at the terminals inside the connection block.

    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]

    A quick dose of contact cleaner on those before connecting the CDI.

    [​IMG]

    The CDI did the trick. Scarlet started!



    There is still a bit of work to do, as none of the lights seem to be working. This is the best progress I’ve made on Scarlet in forever though!

    I moved Eric back into the shed and parked Scarlet next to Sylvie.

    They look pretty good together.

    [​IMG]

    If I can figure out the rest of the electrical gremlins, Scarlet will be re-registered soon!

    (copied with minor edits from my blog post of the same name)
     
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  10. TechHeadFred

    TechHeadFred Well-Known Member Premium Member Contributing Member

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    Scarlet Gets A New Battery, And Eric A Spare CDI
    (Originally Posted on 20/02/2017)


    To rule out the battery as the source of the electrical gremlins, I invested in a brand new battery for Scarlet.

    [​IMG]

    This is the exact same model of battery I bought for her back in 2014, so I knew I’d have to fill it.

    [​IMG]

    As filling the battery involved wearing gloves and handling acid, I opted not to take photos of this process.

    I removed the old battery from Scarlet and replaced it with the new one.

    [​IMG]

    Old on the left, new on the right.

    [​IMG]

    I threaded the outlet hose through the frame in case of leakage.

    [​IMG]

    After starting Scarlet successfully with the new battery, the horn and lights still refused to work. At least I’ve ruled out a faulty battery!

    Knowing that I now have 2 batteries that should start a CB250RS, I put the older battery in Eric, then had a look through my spares box for another CDI box. I soon found that I still had one in reasonable condition, so I cleaned the contacts with contact cleaner, while the rubber mount and and the box itself were cleaned up with some Inox.

    [​IMG]

    The mounting point was a bit too rusty for my liking, so it got a shot of Inox too before I installed the CDI.

    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]

    It was a little late in the evening to try starting Eric, so I decided to give the tank a bit of a clean up too.

    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]

    Seeing how it looked while still wet, I might have to go over it with some cut & polish, then follow up with some clear coat!

    The seat got a good dose of Inox and came up quite nicely too.

    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]

    Next I’ll have to continue trying to figure out what’s not working and see why these won’t light up!

    [​IMG]

    I might see if I can find the white paint pen I used on the choke and have a crack at re-lettering the dash lights too…

    (copied from my blog post of the same name)
     
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  11. TechHeadFred

    TechHeadFred Well-Known Member Premium Member Contributing Member

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    Searching For A Stopper Plate Leads To A Cleaner Shed
    (Originally Posted on 27/02/2017)


    Last week, I fitted my spare CDI to Eric but hadn’t had a chance to try starting him.

    This week, I started Scarlet but wasn’t able to get her to run long enough to idle properly. I decided to try Eric and found he started more reliably but needed the idle speed adjusted again, so the replacement CDI did the trick.

    While stating Scarlet, I noticed that the front footpeg was a bit loose and something seemed to be missing.

    [​IMG]

    I checked Eric and confirmed he had a stopper plate that was missing from Scarlet, which explained the loose spring for the rear brake light switch!

    [​IMG]

    I checked the contents of both my spares boxes and didn’t find one in amongst all the other parts!

    [​IMG]

    So I decided to check Bruiser, Sure enough, his was still there.

    [​IMG]

    Unfortunately, Bruiser was underneath the workbench I’ve left Rosie’s parts on (more on that in another post)

    [​IMG]

    Rosie’s tank has also been taking up valuable shed floor space.

    [​IMG]

    So I moved Rosie out of the shed.

    [​IMG]

    The tank followed Rosie out of the shed.

    [​IMG]

    There was still a fair bit on and in front of the workbench.

    [​IMG]

    Having come this far, I decided to move everything else out of the way. Out came the dead heater, broken shelf, the lid for the the fibreglass parts box and oneof the few parts i still have from Nix – her original seat!

    [​IMG]

    Looking better, I can see Bruiser’s front end properly now!

    [​IMG]

    There was still a lot of stuff on the bench though!

    [​IMG]

    A fair bit in front of the bench too…

    [​IMG]

    Fortunately, I had a portable clothes hanger/shelf that some of that could go on…

    [​IMG]

    Clearing a few things off the workbench…

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]

    Finally clear of most of the extra stuff that’s not part of Rosie!

    [​IMG]

    I moved the whole top of the workbench out parts and all, as I’d laid them out in a specific order when dismantling Rosie.

    [​IMG]

    With the top of the bench removed, I just needed to remove one cross-piece…

    [​IMG]

    …and the bench frame could be lifted out over Bruiser.

    [​IMG]

    Now Bruiser was free at last!

    [​IMG]

    The bench frame went on top of the bench top with Rosie’s parts.

    [​IMG]

    I moved Bruiser in to the middle of the shed and took a closer look at the stopper plate.

    [​IMG]

    I moved the workbench in front of the garden shed until it was ready to go back in the bike shed.

    [​IMG]

    It occurred to me that this would be the perfect opportunity to rearrange the bikes so I could start swapping Eric’s engine onto Bruiser’s frame, so I moved Bruiser out of the shed too.

    [​IMG]

    I’d noticed some damage to the shed floor while moving everything, so I had a look under the rubber floor mat while the shed was mostly empty.

    [​IMG]

    The thin sheet of particle board I’d covered up this corner with had completely disintegrated, so I removed the remnants of it and placed a scrap piece of Craftwood over the damaged section of floor, then re-covered it with the rubber mat.

    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    After a break for lunch during the hottest part of a summer Sunday, I spent some time rearranging the carport, put Rosie with the other bikes, and then put her cover on.
    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    Back in the shed, I found a place for almost everything after a fair bit of rearranging!

    [​IMG]

    All that was missing was Eric and Bruiser, so I moved them back in and called it a day.

    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    The next step will be swapping Eric’s motor into Bruiser’s frame and transferring most of Eric’s other parts to Bruiser before attempting to free the stuck piston in Bruiser’s engine.

    Time to consult the manuals and double-check the engine removal and refitting process!

    (copied from my blog post of the same name)
     
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  12. TechHeadFred

    TechHeadFred Well-Known Member Premium Member Contributing Member

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    Bruiser Gets Prepped For A Parts Transplant
    (Originally Posted on 01/03/2017)


    Last night I started removing parts from Bruiser to replace with working parts from Eric.

    I started with the throttle, kill switch and main light switch on the right switch block.

    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    Switch block off the handlebars

    [​IMG]

    I loosened the handlebar clamp slightly to remove the headlight holder and right switch block together.

    [​IMG]

    With the right switch block removed, off came the clutch lever/left switch block and front master brake cylinder

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Throttle cables disconnected.

    [​IMG]

    THe master brake line was threaded through the retaining plate on the front forks, so that was next to come off.

    [​IMG]

    Rubber stoppers for the headlight frame removed.

    [​IMG]

    A bit of WD40 to help loosen up the bolts..

    [​IMG]

    Brake line disconnected at the caliper…

    [​IMG]

    Ans the front brake line and master cylinder are off!

    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    The triple tree and front forks have seen better days, so I’ll probably rebuild Eric’s and use those.

    [​IMG]

    BOlts and retaining plate removed.

    [​IMG]

    Next up was the tacho cable.

    [​IMG]

    Another squirt of WD40 and the retaining screw turned easily.

    [​IMG]

    Tacho cable removed from the engine.

    [​IMG]

    Next up was the clutch cable.

    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    The stopper plate looked easy enough to remove. It’s only one bolt, right?

    [​IMG]

    It came out a little bit, then stuck tight.

    [​IMG]

    So I decided to remove the kickstart pedal while waiting for the WD40 to work its way in.

    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]

    The stopper plate bolt was really stuck! After starting to round off the bolt head with a 14 mm open-ended/12-point ring spanner, I switched to a 14 mm hexagonal socket. Two broken cheap 3/8th-inch socket wrenches later, I switched to my higher quality SupaTool 3/8th-inch socket wrench and finally got the bolt out!

    [​IMG]

    Fortunately, these flange bolts are still a common Honda part, so I’ll be able to get a replacement for about $2.50.

    After working up a sweat wrestling with the stuck bolt, I decided to clean up the frame and rear mudguard/fender with some Inox and a soft cloth.

    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]

    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]

    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    With the fender and frame looking a bit nicer, I gave the handlebars and the top of the triple tree a once-over as well.

    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]

    Finaly, it was time to drain any old engine oil before attempting to remove the engine ready for the “parts transplant”

    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    The sump plug looks like it could use a new crush washer if the engine is ever re-used, as the current one is decidedly crushed!

    [​IMG]

    Bruiser is looking much better and ready for new parts to be fitted.

    [​IMG]

    Eric will be the donor bike, since his frame is unlikely to pass a rego inspection unless welded back together.

    [​IMG]

    Tonight, I removed Bruiser’s engine. Photos and more details will be in the next update!

    (copied from my blog post of the same name)
     
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  13. TechHeadFred

    TechHeadFred Well-Known Member Premium Member Contributing Member

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    Bruiser Is Stripped Nearly Bare – CB250RS Seized Motor Removal
    Originally Posted on 02/03/2017)


    I’d been preparing to remove Bruiser’s motor, so last night I set to work.

    I’d left the oil to drain overnight, so first I removed the waste oil tray.

    [​IMG]

    The remaining cables were removed from the right side of the motor and the bike lift placed under the engine. Its lowest setting seemed a little high to be useful, but I left it there just in case.

    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    Next I disconnected the gear shift linkage.

    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    Although the chain had already been removed from Bruiser, I removed the front sprocket.

    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    The front sprocket, retaining plate and bolts will be added to the spares box.

    [​IMG]

    Next I started removing the front engine mounting bracket.

    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]

    I’d already removed the main bolt from the cylinder head brackets while removing other parts from Bruiser, so I removed the two remaining bolts.

    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    I threaded the two bolts through so as not to lose them before adding the assembly to the parts box.

    [​IMG]

    The top rear engine bolt was next.

    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    It was far easier to remove than I expected.

    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    The rear bolt was a little trickier, as the motor was starting to be pulled down by gravity. The bike lift came in handy after all!

    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    With the rear bolt removed, I was nearly done!

    [​IMG]

    I’d forgotten to disconnect the cables leading to internal electrical components, so I quickly disconnected them.

    [​IMG], [​IMG]

    The motor came free with a little more maneuvering.

    [​IMG]

    I cleared a space on the bench for it and placed down some sheet rubber and an old towel from my box of rags to absorb any excess oil.

    [​IMG]

    Bruiser was now just a shell of the bike he once was!

    [​IMG]

    The gaps will be filled in soon enough though.

    [​IMG]

    While clearing space on the bench for the motor I found a number of parts that must have been missed while rebuilding Scarlet’s top end, including the missing stopper plate for the rear brake pedal and the bolt from the cylinder head mounting brackets

    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    As I’ll be attempting to free the stuck piston, I’ve propped up the old motor with an old scissor jack for now.

    [​IMG]

    Tonight I tackled removing the “good” (running) motor from Eric. More on that next time!

    (copied from my blog post of the same name)
     
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  14. TechHeadFred

    TechHeadFred Well-Known Member Premium Member Contributing Member

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    2007 CBF250F, 2004 KLR650, 1992 FZR400, 2 x CB250RS (1980 and 1982),
    Eric Donates An Engine (And Another Few Parts) – Another CB250RS Motor Removal
    Origianlly Posted on 04/03/2017)


    On Thursday evening, I started Eric and ran him for a while to heat the oil so it would drain better.
    I also confirmed that the headlight works while he’s running, so there are less electrical issues to sort out than I thought!

    When removing the sump plug to drain the oil, I discovered the sump plug was loose and had already drained the oil for me – or possibly I’d never replaced it after I last drained it!

    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    At least this sump plug had a crush washer that wasn’t crushed!

    [​IMG]

    With the oil drained, I made sure the fuel tap was off and started thinking about which parts to remove.

    [​IMG]

    The mounting bolts for the rear rails were first.

    [​IMG]

    Followed closely by the single mounting bolt for the seat.
    The tail fairing still has the now extremely rare 2fitycc.com vinyl decals on it!

    [​IMG]

    With the seat removed from Eric, I remembered why I was swapping the motors over.

    [​IMG]

    The seat had to go somewhere, so I put it on Bruiser’s frame for now.

    [​IMG]

    The replacement seat mounting bolt was left on the seat until needed.

    [​IMG]

    The rear rail mounting bolts were next.

    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    The mounting bolt removed.

    [​IMG]

    Rinse and repeat for the left side!

    [​IMG]

    The mounting bolts for the rear rails on Bruiser were just loosely placed long hex key bolts originally bought as part of a replacement screw kit for Eric’s engine. They are much thinner bolts and were never intended as a permanent solution.

    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    The rails definitely look better with the original Honda bolts in place!

    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    <continued below>
    (copied from part of my blog post of the same name)
     
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  15. TechHeadFred

    TechHeadFred Well-Known Member Premium Member Contributing Member

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    <continued from above post>

    I disconnected the tail light and rear indicators…

    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    …and then removed the whole rear mudguard/fender along with the chopped-off piece of frame.

    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]

    I’m pretty sure this would fail a rego inspection unless the rear rails were bolted in place extremely tightly. As I recall, the seat shifted considerably when sat on and the cuts to the frame were visible even with the seat on.

    [​IMG]

    The modified rear section of frame could possibly be welded on but I lack both the tools and experience for the task. I’m pretty sure J B Weld would be spotted and draw further attention to the fact that the frame has been cut in the first place. I also don’t have the budget or time to book a mechanical engineer to certify that any potential repairs or modifications don’t cause the bike not to be compliant with the Australian Design Rules (ADR)

    [​IMG]

    I removed the number-plate holder and rear fairng/tail light assembly from the mudguard/fender proper.

    [​IMG]

    The rear fender on its own, just before going into the parts box.

    [​IMG]

    Eric’s rear shocks had a long dome-headed nut and large chromed washer. Off they came!

    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    With nothing holding them on, the rear bars were removed complete with indicators. The indicators looked a bit crooked!

    [​IMG]

    The right rear shock on Bruiser’s frame was quite rusty, while Eric’s was in much better shape.

    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]

    Off they came! Bruiser’s shock on the left, Eric’s on the right.

    [​IMG]

    The better shock was mounted on Bruiser”s frame, along with the dome-headed nut

    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    I’d run out of room n my spares box, so the spare shock went onto Eric with the standard nut to hold it on at the top.

    [​IMG]

    The left rear shock on Bruiser’s frame was in better condition, so only the nut and chromed washer were transferred across.

    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    Time to remove the tank!

    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    It turned out that the fuel line was stuck fast to the tap and the carburetor inlet.

    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    After a few attempts to wiggle it off, the hose broke at the carburetor end so will need to be replaced when I top up the oil after the parts transplant is complete.

    [​IMG]

    The left side panel was still holding the tank down, so off it came too.

    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    The tank was removed from Eric, along with the single rubber stopper. I’ll need to track down another one from somewhere eventually.

    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]

    Rubber stopper transferred to Bruiser’s frame and the tank mounted temporarily.

    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]

    Eric is looking more like the half-a-bike he was when I first got him.

    [​IMG]

    Back to disconnecting things from the motor!
    First was the tacho cable.

    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    Next the High Tension lead to the spark plug.

    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    <continued below>
    (copied from part of my blog post of the same name)
     
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  16. TechHeadFred

    TechHeadFred Well-Known Member Premium Member Contributing Member

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    2007 CBF250F, 2004 KLR650, 1992 FZR400, 2 x CB250RS (1980 and 1982),
    <continued from above post>

    The crooked indicators had been bothering me, so I set about disconnecting them from their mounting posts.

    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    Next I removed the post from the rear bar, freeing up the mounting bracket.

    [​IMG]

    Finally I removed the metal collar and rubber grommet.

    [​IMG]

    RInse and repeat on the other side.

    [​IMG]

    The metal collar and and rubber grommet have been shown still installed as a reference for reassembly.

    [​IMG]

    All the right-hand indicator mounting hardware disassembled.

    [​IMG]

    Both rear indicators and their connecting parts. Some of these need straightening before re-use.

    [​IMG]

    Back to removing the motor again!
    I removed the gear lever linkage.

    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    The front chain guard was next.

    [​IMG]

    The front sprocket bolts and retaining plate came off next.

    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]

    Front sprocket was removed from the drive shaft and put aside with the other spare parts.

    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]

    I disconnected the wiring connector blocks

    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    Removed the retaining bolts from the carburetor sleeve

    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    The header pipe where the right muffler should be was next.

    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    The left pillion peg was next, as it shares a mounting bolt with the left muffler. It was followed by the muffler.

    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]

    The wiring connector blocks for the remaining internal electrics were disconnected.

    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]

    All the wires and the overflow hose were moved out of the frame, and the oil draining pan moved safely out of the way.

    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    The clutch cable was disconnected next.

    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    At last we move on to the mounting bolts! The cable here was passed through and put aside with the others still leading into the motor.

    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    The brake stopper plate was next.

    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    I put some bricks under the main stand to raise the bike enough support the motor on the motorbike lift, then removed the rear brake pedal.

    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]

    The bricks gave enough clearance to fully extend the motorbike lift and lock it in place to support the motor.

    [​IMG]

    Once the mounting bolts were removed, the motor came out pretty easily!

    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]

    After having a break from working on the bikes last night, I’ll be installing the motor in Bruiser’s old frame and starting to transfer the rest of the parts over the weekend.

    (copied from part of my blog post of the same name)
     
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  17. TechHeadFred

    TechHeadFred Well-Known Member Premium Member Contributing Member

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    The Parts Transplant Continues – CB250RS Motor Replacement
    (Originally Posted on 06/03/2017)


    After removing the motors from Bruiser and Eric, it was finally time to install the working motor in Bruiser’s old frame.

    First I collected the bricks from around Eric’s stand, as I would need them for raising Bruiser’s frame.

    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    I also needed to pick up the mufflers! I hung the right header pipe up next to the left one.

    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    There was room for the left muffler there too.

    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    I’ve ordered a right muffler but it most likely won’t arrive until next week.

    Next I had to remove the seat, rear fairing and rear mudguard.

    [​IMG]

    I found a safe spot for them on top of the shelves.

    [​IMG]

    Next was the tank, so I could see what I was doing.

    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    I put it on top of Sylvie’s old rear wheel (I should probably either sell that or get a new tyre and keep it as a spare!)

    [​IMG]

    With a bit more room to work around the frame, I scooted the motor into a better position and moved the bricks near the legs of the main stand.

    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]

    After lifting the frame up and putting the main stand onto the bricks, I moved them back a bit so the motorbike lift would fit in better.

    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]

    With the bike lift in place, I put the motor on it and raised the motor into the frame.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    <continued below>
    (copied from part of my blog post of the same name)
     
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  18. TechHeadFred

    TechHeadFred Well-Known Member Premium Member Contributing Member

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    My Bike:
    2007 CBF250F, 2004 KLR650, 1992 FZR400, 2 x CB250RS (1980 and 1982),
    <continued from above post>

    I gave the mounting bolts a good blast of WD40. Photos on the left are before, on the right is after.

    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    It took a bit of effort but finally I was able to get all the mounting bolts back in.

    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    I lowered the bike lift, took it out and removed the bricks from under the main stand.
    A fair bit of oil came out considering none had come out when I drained the oil, so I mopped it up with an oily towel and put the oil tray back underneath.

    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    I decided the sump plug should go back in next.

    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    Next I reattached the gear shift lever.

    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    Connected the High Tension lead from the ignition coil to the spark plug.

    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    As there was no regulator/rectifier on the frame, I removed Eric’s

    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    I mounted the regulator/rectifier and gave all the electrical connectors a thorough spray with electrical contact cleaner.

    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    I’ll need to move the lights, switch blocks, speedo and tacho to the other bike, so I started by taking off the headlight. from the front of the housing.

    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    Since the headlight was working when Eric was run last, I took lots of photos of how everything was connected before unplugging everything.

    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]

    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]

    After removing the headlight housing, I disconnected the tacho and speedo cables and decided to call it a night.

    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    Both Bruiser and Eric are now just half-bikes. I’ll need to stop thinking of them as separate bikes soon!

    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    More on that next time!
    (copied from part of my blog post of the same name)

    (Update spam over, sorry for the flood of posts! :help:)
     
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    Last edited: Mar 6, 2017
  19. TechHeadFred

    TechHeadFred Well-Known Member Premium Member Contributing Member

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    Switching Controls, Clocks, Locks, And Switches
    Originally Posted on 13/03/2017)


    This week, I started transferring the switches and controls across to the now-empty handlebars on what used to be Bruiser.

    Here are the nearly bare handlebars before I started:

    20170312_111045.jpg

    And the switches and controls I am transferring across:

    20170312_111051.jpg

    First up, I removed the instrument cluster/clock assembly (ignition switch, instrument lights, speedo and tacho) and put it aside.

    20170312_111736.jpg

    Next I removed the choke cable from the carburetor.

    20170312_111804.jpg 20170312_111839.jpg 20170312_111956.jpg 20170312_112036.jpg 20170312_112041.jpg 20170312_112110.jpg

    With the choke assembly off, I removed the clutch cable and left switch block connectors.

    20170312_112133-e1489402584916.jpg 20170312_112208.jpg 20170312_112525.jpg

    Removed the clutch lever and left switch block from Eric’s old handlebar and installed on the other one.

    20170312_112547.jpg 20170312_113025.jpg 20170312_113030.jpg

    Fitted the clutch cable at both ends.

    20170312_113227.jpg 20170312_113303.jpg 20170312_113314-e1489402896482.jpg

    Time to remove the throttle cables.

    20170312_114037.jpg 20170312_114045.jpg

    20170312_114113-e1489403186882.jpg 20170312_114137-e1489403390868.jpg

    Disconnected the right switch block cables and removed the throttle and right switch block assembly.

    20170312_114146.jpg 20170312_114237.jpg

    The switch block was held on with a single screw that has seen better days. I swapped the screws out from the spare and replaced them with the damaged screw when re-fitting them on the other handlebar.

    20170312_114616.jpg 20170312_114724.jpg 20170312_114910.jpg

    Slowly building up the controls on the recipient frame, while more and more of Eric is going in the spare parts box.

    20170312_114917.jpg 20170312_114941.jpg

    The carburetor was next to come out.

    20170312_115028-e1489404055562.jpg 20170312_115049-e1489404069177.jpg 20170312_115052-e1489404084323.jpg

    <continued below>

    (copied from part of my blog post of the same name)
     
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  20. TechHeadFred

    TechHeadFred Well-Known Member Premium Member Contributing Member

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    <continued from above post>

    The left grip had always looked a little out of place. I have another throttle assembly with a matching one in the spares box if I remember correctly though.

    20170312_115227.jpg

    The left end of Eric’s handlebar is totally bare now!

    20170312_115233.jpg

    To get the brake line out, I had to remove the front badge plate.

    20170312_115719.jpg 20170312_115819.jpg

    20170312_115851.jpg

    Removed the handlebar clamps next, as the headlight/indicator mount is held down by the handlebar.

    20170312_115922.jpg 20170312_115919.jpg

    20170312_120151.jpg

    I decided to remove Eric’s handlebar altogether.

    20170312_120156-e1489405026792.jpg

    I left the indicators on the headlight mount for now, although I’ll probably dismantle them and give the exposed surfaces a good clean with electrical contact cleaner before reassembly.

    20170312_120238-e1489405220785.jpg

    The front mounting plate needed to come off the forks before the brake line culd be removed.

    20170312_120355.jpg

    20170312_120526.jpg

    While I had access to it, I removed the steering lock.

    20170312_120535.jpg 20170312_120636.jpg

    I tested the lock with the ignition key to make sure it still worked and that it was definitely a match.

    20170312_120704.jpg 20170312_120712.jpg

    Onto the complete frame it went!

    20170312_120825.jpg 20170312_120830.jpg

    I removed the master brake cylinder and Eric’s handlebar was free at last.

    20170312_120902.jpg 20170312_121053.jpg 20170312_121113.jpg

    I put it with on the shelf next to the seat and spare red tank.

    20170312_121136.jpg

    I finished removing the brake line.

    20170312_121805.jpg

    Then I replaced the banjo bolt in the front brake assembly.

    20170312_121949.jpg

    I fitted the mounting bracket to the front forks on the complete frame, making sure the brake line and wiring loom had been passed through it during assembly.

    20170312_122843.jpg 20170312_123245.jpg

    Connected the brake line to the front brake assembly, ready to bleed fresh fluid through.

    20170312_123751.jpg

    I tightened up the handlebar mounts again and called it a day.

    20170312_123918.jpg

    Reassembly will continue this week, Hopefully the right side muffler will arrive soon too!

    (copied from part of my blog post of the same name)
     
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